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Hunting Gun Laws in Canada

Changes to the Canadian Firearms Program

On April 5, 2012, Bill C-19, Ending the Long-Gun RegistryAct, came into effect. The key changes are as follows:

  • Removal of the requirement to register non-restricted firearms
  • Destruction of the existing non-restricted firearms registration records
  • Allowing the transferor of a non-restricted firearm to obtain confirmation of a transferee’s firearms acquisition licence prior to the transfer being finalized

Until further notice, due to a Court Order issued by the Quebec Superior Court, residents of Quebec are still required to register non-restricted firearms with the RCMP Canadian Firearms Program.

It is important to note that the new law does not change the requirement for all individuals to hold a licence in order to possess a firearm. The licensing, safety training and safe storage requirements for anyone who uses or owns a firearm continue to be in force.

The legislation also does not impact registration requirements for restricted or prohibited firearms.

 


Changes to the Canadian Firearms Program

On April 5, 2012, Bill C-19, Ending the Long-Gun RegistryAct, came into effect. The key changes are as follows:

  • Removal of the requirement to register non-restricted firearms
  • Destruction of the existing non-restricted firearms registration records
  • Allowing the transferor of a non-restricted firearm to obtain confirmation of a transferee’s firearms acquisition licence prior to the transfer being finalized

Until further notice, due to a Court Order issued by the Quebec Superior Court, residents of Quebec are still required to register non-restricted firearms with the RCMP Canadian Firearms Program.

It is important to note that the new law does not change the requirement for all individuals to hold a licence in order to possess a firearm. The licensing, safety training and safe storage requirements for anyone who uses or owns a firearm continue to be in force.

The legislation also does not impact registration requirements for restricted or prohibited firearms.

 

 

News Flash February 15, 2012 - The bill to end the Long Gun Registry has passed in the House of Commons. Next on the agenda are:

 

 

Topics on this page:

Requirement to Own a Firearm

Anyone in Canada who owns or wants to own a firearm must do the following:

  • Take the Canadian Firearms Safety Course (CFSC);

  • Pass the the CGSC test, or show that they have already taken the Canadian Firearms Safety Course and passed the test (good for life, unless the applicant is later subject to a prohibition order); or

  • Pass (or have already passed) the test without taking the course; or show that they have taken a course before January 1, 1995, approved by the Attorney General of Manitoba or Quebec; or

  • Have a Chief Firearms Officer certify that their knowledge of firearms laws and safe handling practices meets the standards set out in the Regulations (only for adults who have owned a firearm since January 1, 1979).

  • Obtain a licence. This law became effective December 1, 1998. Prior to that date in order to purchase and own a firearm one must have had a FAC. "FAC" stands for Firearms Acquisition Certificate. It was the certificate needed to get a firearm before December 1, 1998. As long as they are valid, FACs can act as licences.
  • A Summary of Firearms Licence Requirements and Fees

    Type of Licence

    Requirements

    Fees

    POSSESSION ONLY

    • firearms owned on December 1,1998
    • for adults (18 yrs or older)
    • must have applied by December 31, 2000

    1.        Not available to new applicants after January 1, 2001.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    POSSESSION LICENCE FOR MINORS

    • to possess non-restricted firearms
    • minors 12-17 yrs
    • sustenance hunters under 18 yrs

    1.        A parent or guardian must give consent.

    2.        The applicant and a parent or guardian must accept the conditions of the licence by signing a form, and confirm that the photo (of the applicant) with the application accurately identifies the applicant.

    3.        Applicants must show proof that safety course requirements have been met (does not apply to sustenance hunters).

    (Minors can possess or use but cannot acquire or register firearms in their name.)

    • $10: 0-1 yr.
    • $20: 1-2 yrs
    • $30: over 2 yrs

    POSSESSION AND ACQUISITION

    • to get non-restricted firearms
    • to get restricted firearms
    • to get another prohibited firearm in the same category
    • for adults (18 yrs or older)
    • also allows possession of currently-owned firearms

    1.        The applicant and one other person who has known the applicant for at least 1 year must sign a statement confirming that an accompanying photo (of the applicant) accurately identifies the applicant.

    2.        Two people (other than a spouse) must sign a statement confirming that they have known the applicant for at least three years and to the best of their knowledge and belief:

    • the information in the application is true;
    • the applicant does not pose a threat to public safety.

    3.        The applicant must provide the name, current address and telephone number of every spouse or common-law partner with whom the applicant has lived during the past two years. If their whereabouts are unknown, the applicant must make a written statement (on the form) to that effect. (Spouses and common-law partners will be notified about the application.)

    4.        There is a minimum 28-day waiting period unless the applicant has a valid FAC or licence.

    5.        Applicants must show proof that safety course requirements have been met.

    There are additional requirements for restricted and prohibited firearms.

    • $60 for 5 yrs (non-restricted); OR
    • $80 for 5 yrs (restricted and prohibited)

     

    TEMPORARY FIREARM BORROWING LICENCE

    • for visitors to Canada (18 yrs or older)

    1.        For visitors borrowing non-restricted firearms in Canada -- as of January 1, 2001.

    2.        Applicant must be sponsored by a licensed Canadian individual or organization.

    3.        Applicant and or sponsor must fill out form in advance + send to Chief Firearms Officer.

    • $30 for 60 days (may be renewed once at no charge)

    NON-RESIDENT FIREARMS DECLARATION

    • for visitors to Canada

    (18 yrs or older)

    1.        For visitors bringing firearms into Canada

    2.        Firearms must be declared in writing at point of entry, and confirmed by a Customs officer

    3.        Form should be filled out in triplicate before arriving at Customs

    4.        Valid for up to 60 days at a time

    5.        Declaration must be confirmed each time you cross the border.

     

    • $50
    • only payable once in a 12-month period.
    • No fee for additional declarations made in that period.

     

    All Firearms are Required to be Registered

    Register Firearms Online

    The Criminal Code requires all firearms owned on December 1, 1998, to be registered by January 1, 2003.

    Starting December 1, 1998:

    To register, firearm owners need one of the following:

    Identifying Firearms

    When registering a firearm, owners will need to provide a description of each firearm that is being registered.

    Serial Numbers and Firearm Identification Numbers (FINs)

    Once a firearm has been identified and classified as non-restricted, restricted or prohibited, the Registrar will issue a registration certificate for that firearm.

    Every registration certificate will have a firearm identification number.

    If the firearm has a serial number that identifies the firearm from every other firearm, the FIN does not have to be placed on the firearm.

    If the firearm:

     

    Links to More Information

    Firearms Act

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